Let's Talk About Names


Admetos, Gaia, Xanthe: These are all names from ancient mythology. Our dog pullovers also carry these names, because for us, our dogs are brave little heroes in everyday life.

So with a feeling of well-being and safety, our little dears can continue their usual outside routines, even on those cooler days.

ADMETOS

(Greek: Ἄδμητος Admetos, “untamed”, “untameable”) was a king of Pherae in Thessaly. He was famed for his hospitality and justice. Product Link

APOLLON

(GEN Ἀπόλλωνος) has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo is the son of Zeus and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis. Product Link

ARTEMIS

(/ˈɑːrtɪmɪs/; Greek: Ἄρτεμις Artemis, Attic Greek: [ár.te.mis]) was one of the most widely venerated of the Ancient Greek deities.
In the classical period of Greek mythology, Artemis was often described as the daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollon. She was the Hellenic goddess of the hunt, wild animals, wilderness, childbirth, virginity and protector of young girls, bringing and relieving disease in women. Product Link

BEROE

(Greek: Βερόη) in Greek mythology is a nymph of Beirut, the daughter of Aphrodite and Adonis, and sister of Golgos. Beroe wore no ornaments or make-up, and she was not vain and never examined herself in the mirror. She was a mortal but often her beauty was compared to that of goddesses. Product Link

ELEKTRA

(Greek: Ἠλέκτρα, Ēlektra) was the daughter of King Agamemnon and Queen Clytemnestra, and thus princess of Argos. She is also the central figure in plays by Aeschylus, Alfieri, Voltaire, Hofmannsthal, and Eugene O’Neill. Product Link

ERSA

(Ancient Greek: Ἕρσα “dew”) is the goddess of dew and the daughter of Zeus and the Moon (Selene). Product Link

GAIA

/ˈɡeɪ.ə/ or /ˈɡaɪ.ə/; from Ancient Greek Γαῖα, a poetical form of Γῆ Gē, “land” or “earth”), also spelled Gaea (/ˈdʒiːə/), is the personification of the Earth and one of the Greek primordial deities. Gaia is the ancestral mother of all life: the primal Mother Earth goddess. Product Link

HEMERA

(Ancient Greek: Ἡμέρα [hɛːméra] “day”) was the personification of day and one of the Greek primordial deities. She is the goddess of the daytime and, according to Hesiod, the daughter of Erebus and Nyx (the goddess of night). Product Link

HERMES

(/ˈhɜːrmiːz/; Greek: Ἑρμῆς) is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods (Dionysus being the youngest). Product Link

KRATOS

(Ancient Greek: Κράτος, English translation: “State”) is the son of Pallas and Styx and the personification of authority in all its forms. Product Link

KRONOS

Greek: Κρόνος, krónos) was the leader and youngest of the first generation of Titans, the divine descendants of Uranus, the sky, and Gaia, the earth. Product Link

LEANDER

(Ancient Greek: Λέανδρος, Léandros), a young man from Abydos on the opposite side of the strait. Leander fell in love with Hero and would swim every night across the Hellespont to spend time with her. Hero would light a lamp at the top of her tower to guide his way. Product Link

LEONTEUS

(Ancient Greek: Λεοντεύς) referred to the following individuals: Leonteus, son of Coronus (the son of Caeneus) and Cleobule, was one of the commanders of the Lapiths during the Trojan War. Product Link

MAGNES

(Greek: Μάγνης) was the eponym and first king of Magnesia. Magnes had a son of remarkable beauty, Hymenaios by the muse Calliope. Product Link

METIS

/ˈmiːtᵻs/ (Μῆτις, “wisdom,” “skill,” or “craft”) By the era of Greek philosophy in the 5th century BC, Metis had become the mother of wisdom and deep thought, but her name originally connoted “magical cunning” and was as easily equated with the trickster powers of Prometheus as with the “royal metis” of Zeus. The Stoic commentators allegorised Metis as the embodiment of “prudence”, “wisdom” or “wise counsel”, in which form she was inherited by the Renaissance. Product Link

NYX

(Ancient Greek: Νύξ, “Night”; Latin: Nox) is the Greek goddess (or personification) of the night. Her appearances reveal her as a figure of such exceptional power and beauty that she is feared by Zeus himself. Product Link

PHILOTES

(Greek: Φιλότης) was a minor goddess or spirit (daimones) personifying affection and friendship. She was a daughter of the goddess Nyx. Product Link

PYLADES

(/ˈpaɪlədiːz/; Greek: Πυλάδης) is the son of King Strophius of Phocis and of Anaxibia. He is mostly known for his strong friendship with his cousin Orestes, son of Agamemnon. Product Link

SELENE

(/sᵻˈliːni/; Greek Σελήνη [selɛ̌ːnɛː] ‘moon’;) is the goddess of the moon. She drives her moon chariot across the heavens. Product Link

THALLO

(Greek Θαλλώ) One of the Horae, and the goddess and personification of the season of Spring; she is the protector of new growth. Product Link

THAUMAS

In Greek mythology, (/ˈθɔːməs/; Ancient Greek: Θαύμας; gen.: Θαύμαντος) was a sea god, son of Pontus and Gaia, and the full brother of Nereus, Phorcys, Ceto and Eurybia. Product Link

URANOS

(/ˈjʊərənəs/ or /jʊˈreɪnəs/; Ancient Greek Οὐρανός, Ouranos [oːranós] meaning “sky” or “heaven”) was the primal Greek god personifying the sky. Product Link

XANTHE

(Ancient Greek: Ὠκεανίδες) was an Okeanis whose name means “blond-haired”. Product Link

ZELOS

(Greek: Ζῆλος, Zēlos, literally “zeal”) personifies dedication, emulation, eager rivalry, and zeal. The English word “zeal” is derived from his name. Product Link